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In Sales Service Means Business

By Jim Meisenheimer
Posted Tuesday, February 1, 2005

Some businesses flourish while others slowly fade away. There’s usually a good reason. Here are two examples.

Bernadette, my wife, has a busy schedule. She will often call for a manicure at the last minute. She’s been going to Carol’s Beauty Shop and Day Spa for the past two years. According to Bernadette, whenever she calls Carol and regardless of how full her schedule is, she is always pleasant, professional and very accommodating.

When Bernadette calls and asks “Do you have an opening for a manicure this morning,” Carol never says no. You can hear her smiling on the phone when she says, “Sure, let me see what’s available for you, I’m sure we can fit you in.” Then after looking at the appointment book she says, “I can put you with Rosa at ten or Carla at eleven, which is better for you?”

Her business is booming. Carol started with a staff of two and now employs twenty. She combines the right words with a great attitude.

Example number two. Last week, I needed some office supplies. I went to the Office Max store in Vernon Hills, Illinois. It’s big and it’s close and I always have to wait. It was 2:30 in the afternoon and there was a line at the only cash register that was open.

The woman in front of me was buying about six items including a day timer. The day timer was missing the bar code needed for scanning purposes. The cashier grabbed the microphone and called for assistance. The man approached, with a face that declared, “this better be good.”

He left to go find the price. The customer in front of me said he was going in the wrong direction and took off to find the item herself. Now there were seven people in line. We were waiting, waiting, waiting . . . the very thing I enjoy most, especially when I’m in a hurry.

Finally, after what seemed like an eternity, I speculated quietly to the cashier, that if this kind of service keeps up, Office Max would be out of business in a few years.

The cashier looked at me and said with a scowl, “Good, we all hate working here anyway.”

After awhile longer, I paid my bill and left wondering where I’d be getting my office supplies in the future.

Some businesses flourish while others fade away. The people make the difference in every selling situation. Here are three things to remember every day if you are serious about growing your business.

1. Show up with a positive and professional attitude every day.

2. For all routine situations, know exactly (word for word) how you’ll deal with them.

3. Focus on exceeding all customer expectations every time.

The key to success is you and you really make the difference. It’s hard to focus on the customer and not have them really appreciate your effort.

Good service has its own reward. So does bad service.

About the Author
Jim Meisenheimer is the creator of No-Brainer Sales Training. His sales techniques and selling skills focus on practical ideas that get immediate results. You can discover all his secrets by contacting him at (800) 266-1268 or by visiting his website: (http://www.meisenheimer.com)